CURRENT ISSUE: Looking at this issueís eclectic contents, I am struck by the richness of Irelandís varied contributions to genre literature. Though a small island nation, we donít exist in a hermetically sealed literary bubble. Itís an obvious thing to say, really, but Irish literature has such a strong sense of itself that I sometimes have to remind myself of its kinship with the rest of the literary world. During one of my expeditions to the National Library, I happened upon a contemporary review of E.R. Eddisonís novel The Worm Ouroboros (1922) written by James Stephens, author of the classic fantasy novel The Crock of Gold. More...



 
 


NEW TITLE: In her introduction, Lisa Tuttle observes that ďcertain places are doomed, dangerous in some inexplicable, metaphysical wayĒ, and the characters in these stories all seem drawn in their own ways to just such places, whether trying to return home or endeavouring to get as far from life as possible. These nine stories by Shirley Jackson Award winner Lynda E. Rucker tell tales of those lost and searching, often for something they cannot name, and encountering along the way the uncanny embedded in the everyday world. More...



 
 


FEATURED INTERVIEW: Lynda E. Rucker is an American writer born and raised in the South and now living in Europe. Her stories have appeared in dozens of magazines and anthologies. She is a regular columnist for Black Static, has had a short play produced on Londonís West End, and won the 2015 Shirley Jackson Award for Best Short Story. Her first collection, The Moon Will Look Strange, was published by Karoshi Books in 2013. More...




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