Welcome to Dublin, the City of Ghosts and Guinness! The literary ghost story in all its guises has deep roots in Ireland Ė from the domestic hauntings of Mrs. Riddell's Weird Stories to the spectral disturbances of J.S. Le Fanu's In a Glass Darkly; from Elizabeth Bowen's urbane "Demon Lover" to Bram Stoker's blood-drenched and monolithic contribution to literature: Dracula. We invite you to join us at the Dublin Ghost Story Festival to raise a pint of the black stuff and celebrate literature of the supernaturalóboth past and presentóin a city where some of the genre's most memorable nightmares were born. Slainte! More...



 
 


NEW TITLE: Serialised in 1977, The Pale Brown Thing is a shorter version of Fritz Leiberís World Fantasy Award-winning novel of the supernatural, Our Lady of Darkness. Leiber maintained that the two texts ďshould be regarded as the same story told at different timesĒ; thus this volume reprints The Pale Brown Thing for the first time in nearly forty years, with an introduction by the authorís friend, Californian poet Donald Sidney-Fryer. The novella stands as Leiberís vision of 1970s San Francisco: a city imbued with an eccentric vibe and nefarious entities, in which pulp writer Franz Westen uncovers an alternate portrait of the cityís fin de siecle literary set as well as the darker invocations of occultist Thibaut de Castries. More...



 
 


FEATURED ARTICLE: Donald Sidney-Fryer was born in New Bedford, Massachusetts in 1934. He first met Fritz Leiber in the late 1960s; they remained friends until the end of Leiber's life on 1994. Sidney-Fryer is best known as a poet (Songs and Sonnets Atlantean, The Atlantis Fragments), but has also written non-fiction on Ambrose Bierce, George Sterling, and other Californian writers (The Golden State Phantasticks). His landmark work, The Emperor of Dreams, was a landmark bibliography of his mentor Clark Ashton Smith. Sidney-Fryer lives in Auburn, California. More...



 
 


CURRENT ISSUE: Those living in Ireland will know that this country is in the midst of a year-long commemoration of a watershed event: the 1916 Easter Rising. If you donít know about this event, take a moment to familiarise yourself with it. Suffice to say the rebellion was a major turning point in the centuries-long struggle for Irish independence. However, the violence that erupted in Dublin (and further afield) during that week in the spring of 1916 became the template for twentieth-century Irelandís myriad political and social divisions over which much blood has been spilt, creating wounds that have not yet healed. A terrible beauty indeed. More...




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